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CITATION GUIDE: CHICAGO / TURABIAN

Chicago and Turabian Merge

As of their 16th and 8th editions, Chicago and Turabian style guides include the same rules for citations and bibliographies. The primary difference is the Turabian style is a condensed version of the full Chicago Manual of Style created for student writers.

STYLE GUIDES

The following areas of study often use Chicago or Turabian citation style: history, humanities, religion, peace, justice & conflict studies, and social and natural sciences.

The final authority for these styles are the books listed below. The final authority for the bibliographic form used in your paper is your professor.

MORE RESOURCES

DIVIDING URLs AND DOIs

From 14.12:

In a printed work, if a URL or DOI has to be broken at the end of a line, the break should be made after a colon or a double slash (//); before a single slash(/), a tilde (~), a period, a comma, a hyphen, an underline (_), a question mark, a number sign, or a percent symbol; or before or after an equals sign or an ampersand....A hyphen should never be added to a URL or DOI to denote a line break, nor should a hyphen that is part of a URL or DOI appear at the end of a line.

TWITTER

Below is a suggested style for citing a twitter feed:

2. Garrett Kiely, Twitter post, September 14, 2011, 8:50 a.m., http://twitter.com/gkiely.

CITATIONS IN CHICAGO/TURABIAN

There are two common forms of citation for these styles:

 1. Chicago Notes-Bibliography / Bibliography Style (used mainly in humanities and some social sciences)

This style requires footnotes (or endnotes) and a bibliography. The first time a source appears in a footnote, the full citation is given. The second and subsequent times that source is listed only the author's last name, an abbreviated title and the page number need to be included.

2. Chicago Author-Date / Reference List Style (used in most social sciences and natural and physical science)

This style uses parenthetical citation as sources come up in the text, but only lists the full source in the references list at the end of the paper.

REFERENCES, ELECTRONIC

Full text journal article from a database:

Include the stable URL or DOI (DOI preferred) listed with the article.

(footnote):

   3. Ervin Beck, “Postcolonial Complexity in the Writings of Rudy Wiebe,” MFS Modern Fiction

Studies 47, no. 4 (2001): 859, accessed December 2, 2013, doi:10.1353/mfs.2001.0071.

 

   5. Gil Friedman, “Commercial Pacifism and Protracted Conflict: Models from the

Palestinian-Israeli Case,” The Journal of Conflict Resolution 49, no. 3 (2005): 372,

accessed October 13, 2008, http://www.jstor.org/stable/30045119.

 

(bibliography):

Beck, Ervin. “Postcolonial Complexity in the Writings of Rudy Wiebe.” Modern Fiction Studies 47,
 
   no. 4 (2001): 855-886. doi:10.1353/mfs.2001.0071.
 
 
Friedman, Gil. “Commercial Pacifism and Protracted Conflict: Models from the Palestinian-Israeli
 
   Case.” The Journal of Conflict Resolution 49, no. 3 (2005): 360-382. 
 
   http://www.jstor.org/stable/30045119.
 
 

Website:

(footnote):

   8. “Rudy Wiebe,” Vancouver Writers Fest. accessed December 2, 2013,
 
http://www.writersfest.bc.ca/2011festival/author/rudy-wiebe.
 
 
(bibliography):
 
“Rudy Wiebe.” Vancouver Writers Fest. Accessed December 2, 2013.
 
   http://www.writersfest.bc.ca/2011festival/author/rudy-wiebe.

REFERENCES, PRINT

Book:

(footnote):

   4. Neil J. Smelser, Handbook of Economic Sociology (Princeton: Princeton Univ

Press, 2014), 83.

 

(bibliography):

Smelser, Neil J. Handbook of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University

   Press, 2014.

 

Book association as author:

(footnote):

   2. African Development Bank Group, Structural Transformation and Natural Resources

(Paris: OECD Publications, 2013), 55.

 

(bibliography):

African Development Bank Group. Structural Transformation and Natural Resources. Paris:

   OECD Publications, 2013.

 

Essay by one author in a book edited by another author:

(footnote):

   6. John Fea, “Intellectual Hospitality as Historical Method: Moving beyond the Activist

Impuse,” in The Activist Impulse: Essays on the Intersection of Evangelicalism and Anabaptism,

ed. Jared Burkholder and David Cramer (Eugene: Pickwick Publications, 2012), 81.

 

(bibliography):

Fea, John. “Intellectual Hospitality as Historical Method: Moving beyond the Activist Impulse.”

   In The Activist Impulse: Essays on the Intersection of Evangelicalism and Anabaptism, edited

   by Jared Burkholder and David Cramer, 74-100. Eugene: Pickwick Publications, 2012.

 

Journal article:

(footnote):

   3. Julia Kasdorf, "Mighter than the Sword: Martyrs Mirror in the New World," Conrad Grebel

Review 31, no. 1 (2013): 62.

 

(bibliography):

Kasdorf, Julia. "Mighter than the Sword: Martyrs Mirror in the New World." Conrad Grebel Review

   31, no.1 (2013): 44-70.

 

Biblical citation:

(footnote):

   1. Ps. 139:13-16 NAB.

 

(bibliography):

You do not need to include the Bible in your bibliography.

REFERENCES, OTHER

Video:

(footnote):

   5. Lincoln, directed by Steven Spielberg. (2012; Universal City: DreamWorks Pictures,

2013), DVD.


(bibliography):

Lincoln. Directed by Steven Spielberg 2012. Universal City: DreamWorks Pictures, 2013. DVD.

 
Lecture notes:

(footnote):

   7. Jan Bender Shetler, "Tanzania," (lecture, Goshen College, Goshen, IN January 23, 2000).

 

(bibliography):

Shetler, Jan Bender. "Tanzania." Lecture at Goshen College, Goshen, IN, January 23, 2000.